Trees of Ashmore Park – What A Variety!

10462542_715400025192216_4193381832399208680_n Ashmore Park SignIt is often told me to me that “The Ashmore Park is boring, it only has trees”, and that The Park itself lacks any distinctive planting. So I recently asked the City Council to inform me of the names and the variety of trees that we have on the Ashmore Park.

First I have been blown away by first the number of trees that we have living and creating the oxygen we all need. Then the fact that we have the most wonderful variety of these trees!

We have some 427 trees growing on The Park, many of the varieties were probably planted to extract water from the park as it is a very wet park. Probably because the Park has a ‘clay top’ to keep the rotting rubbish safely  below ground. Previously the land where the Park is was a former Coal Mine which was then used as a rubbish dump for household waste by Wednesfield and surrounding Councils. It generates a great deal of methane and that has to be extracted and dispersed into the wider environment by a system of extractors, you can see working whilst you walk around the pathways of the Park.

IMG_4957The Park was formed around 60 years ago. On your walk around The Park ….

Just take a look at the wonderful numbers and varieties of trees that are either semi mature or mature. The Park is somewhat higher than surrounding properties. The planting of these trees would have been to make the site drier to combat water seepage down the bank and into local homes.

So next time you are walking in the Park see how many tree varieties you can name?

I will during the summer arrange for a tree expert to come and talk to residents about the varieties of tree and identify the more common species and the rare ones too! I know I am looking at the trees in a very much different light than on previous walks. They are working hard for us taking in Carbon and pumping out Oxygen, as well as looking striking and quite mighty!

Ashmore Park – Tree Inventory 09/02/2016
Common Name Botanical Name Age Class Total Trees
Cappadocian Maple Acer cappadocian Semi mature 5
Caucasian Elm Zelkova carpinifolia Mature 16
Common Alder Alnus glutinosa Mature 3
Common Beech Fagus sylvatica Mature 4
Common Lime Tilia europeus Mature 60
English Oak Quercu robur Mature 5
Field Maple Acer campestre Mature 27
Flowering Cherry Prunus spp Semi mature 12
Flowering Crab Apple Malus spp Semi mature 9
Common Ash Fraxinus excelsior Mature 18
Golden Ash Fraxinus ‘Jaspidea’ Semi Mature 3
Grey Alder Alnus incana Semi Mature 60
Hawthorn Crataegus spp Mature 5
Holly Ilex aquifolium Mature 1
Horse chestnut Aesculus hippocastanum Mature 32
Italian Alder Alnus cordata Semi Mature 1
London Plane Platanus hispanica Mature 3
Lombardy Poplar Populus italica Mature 8
Maple Acer spp Semi Mature 6
Norway Maple Acer platanoides Mature 4
Poplar Populus nigra Mature 37
Purple Sycamore Acer ‘Crimson King’ Semi Mature 2
Rowan Sorbus aucuparia Mature 15
Silver Birch Betula pendula Mature 1
Silver Lime Tilia tomentosa Mature 2
Swamp Cypress Taxodium distichum Mature 11
Swedish Whitebeam Sorbus intermedia Mature 17
Sycamore Acer pseudoplatanus Mature 10
Tree of Heaven Ailanthus altissima Semi Mature 4
Western Red Cedar Thuja plicata Mature 2
Whitebeam Sorbus aria Mature 44
Trees on Site 427

Phil Bateman

Phil Bateman is Married to Mary and lives in Wednesfield North. He was a long serving local politician having served previously on the now defunct West Midlands County Council... read more

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